Being You

MerleFest allows for lots of collaboration between artists but it also allows for musicians to be authentic to who they are. When I was in the presser with Keb Mo today and he was asked about how his music was going to fit into the festival he said that the music is music and that is what makes MerleFest what it is. This was a very good point. During the Hillside Album Hour, many artists work together to collaborate on a classic rock album, together they create a bluegrass style but this is only thanks to organizers allowing for individuality. Being you, not showing off, as Doc would’ve wanted it. That is MerleFest.

Familiarity, A MerleFest Haiku

Today I saw various acts at MerleFest including Scythian and Steve Poltz (who, I had never heard of before and was pleasantly surprised by). I did dodge the rain and catch both the end of Andy May’s Appalachian Traditions set and the beginning of the set in which many artists including David Hot, T. Michael Coleman, and Jack Lawerence told stories about Doc Watson. It struck me how familiar the artists were with both each other and other long time festival-goers. I decided to sum up the simple, familiar feeling of Merlefest with a haiku.

Hey out there and you

Let’s make a memory or

Reflect on the past

If you have never been to MerleFest you should check it out! The fun, the music, the familiarity, are all worth your time.

Stay tuned to hear more about what I Had to Ask, and what I have experienced at MerleFest 2019.

Mutual Admiration

Today is the first day of MerleFest 2019 and I am excited to be here for the 11th year, 8th year covering it. I would like to just write for a minute about mutual admiration. There are somethings that just can’t be recorded. Little things that are missed such as Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, and Bela Fleck messing with each other at a press conference. And other things that aren’t recorded simply because the button to start the recording hadn’t been hit yet. 

Today I attended the press conference with Chatham County Line, Dailey and Vincent, and Junior Brown. It was interesting to see the two Chatham County Line members overtaken by the relative stardom of the others at the table. It was also cool to see Junior Brown and Dailey and Vincent excited to see each other perform. Just wanted to share what you learn and observe when you have to ask!

Episode 72: Interview with Evan of Mile 12

We are days away from MerleFest and I am so psyched. I was able to talk with Evan of Mile 12 about the band, their new album and MerleFest. Listen on to see why I Had to Ask!

You can purchase Mile 12’s new album here:
https://www.miletwelvebluegrass.com/store/cityonahill

Episode 71: Interview with Noah from Barefoot Movement

I talked with the frontwoman the Barefoot Movement about MerleFest, the Hillside Album Hours, and touring. Listen on to see why I Had to Ask!

Side Note: The Hillside Album Hour is a tradition to MerleFest in which an album is redone in a bluegrass/Americana style. The album is kept a secret from the festavarians. Noah sang at the 2016 Hillside Album Hour. She mentions that she had been listening to alot of the Eagles. The 2016 album was The Eagles Greatest Hits.

Episode 70: Interview with Max Katz

This interview is a serious throwback but has been one of the biggest eye-openers for me. Because I had this conversation with Max when I was in middle school, I have really become infatuated with the public health and epidemiology fields. The reason I decided to post this interview now is that I have been accepted into the Center for Disease Control’s Disease Detective Summer Program and in my essay, I referenced this conversation. Listen on to see why I Had to Ask.

Episode 69: Interview with Wayland

I talked with rock n’ roll band Wayland at MerleFest 2018. We talked about their music and how it falls into the MerleFest scheme of things.

Naturally, we also talked about the best food they have eaten and advice they have for themselves too.

Listen on to see why I Had to Ask!

MerleFest – Sunday (Blog Post)

The presser on Sunday was crowded and a little hectic so it didn’t naturally lend itself to too much of a theme so to speak.

I did have the opportunity to ask all of the artists at the press conference about their passions outside of music.

Here’s what I found out…

The passions of various members of The Steep Canyon Rangers was wide ranging. 

The responses were…

  • Family
  • Food
  • Festivals
  • Being Outdoors
  • Travel
  • Music Education
  • Fly Fishing
  • Fiddle
  • Trees

And Graham’s passion was his hot tub.

Alison Brown’s passions are the banjo and the roots music community.

Sam Bush’s passion is baseball (Go Cards). 

And…

Steve Martin’s passion is the banjo.

It was really interesting for me to see what musicians are passionate and I was glad that I Had to Ask about musician’s passions. 

MerleFest – Saturday (Blog Post)

A big part of MerleFest is the history it has and the legacy it continues to carry. This was a hot topic at yesterday’s press conference.

According to Jerry Douglas MerleFest is different because not only is it the first music festival of the season, it has the most performers so it is like a big family gathering.

John Cowan feels MerleFest is different because it feels good due to the fact that MerleFest embraces different types of music (as Doc wanted).

Jim Lauderdale feels that MerleFest is different because it sticks with the traditions of having musicians like Sam Bush and Jerry Douglas back, but, they also capture the younger generation of performers and invite them in.

MerleFest also proves to be important to the health of bluegrass and traditional plus music.

John Cowan explained that MerleFest allows for great memories of living legends.

Tommy Emmanuel explained that MerleFest is important because it continues a legacy AND hooks the younger generation.

No matter who you talk with you will find that it is incontrovertible that MerleFest as a festival is important to the health of music.

Thanks for reading about what I Had to Ask.